7 of the Coldest Places on Earth Where People Actually Live

Many of us live in places with chilly winters. Why, it was just 50 degrees Fahrenheit here in Los Angeles over the past couple days and I’ve been positively shivering. I set out to find out where the coldest cities and towns on Earth are and in so doing, accidentally discovered the secret behind the hacking of the U.S. election — most of the coldest cities and towns in the world are in Russia. They want to take over America because they're sick of being so cold. And here's the proof — these are the seven coldest places on Earth where people actually live:



1. Verkhoyansk, Russia

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Only around 1,000 people live out here, and for good reason — the AVERAGE temperature in January is -56 degrees Fahrenheit (-48 Celsius). The all-time low temperature was recorded in 1892 at -90 degrees F. You know how in movies Russian political dissidents are threatened with being sent to Siberia? This is why. Nobody wants to be sent to Siberia.



2. Oymyakon, Russia

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Oymyakon’s 500 residents withstand temperatures equally cold to Verkhoyansk, if not colder. Snow days are, I’d guess, not a thing, as schools stay open on -52 degree days.



3. Yakutsk, Russia

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200,000 people live in Yakutsk, which is usually declared the coldest city in the world. The temperature is below freezing from September through May and reached as low as -81.4 degrees, with a January average of -34 degrees F.



4. Barrow, Alaska

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Barrow, home to 5,000 people, is the northernmost city in the United States, where the sun sets in November and doesn’t rise again until the end of January. The average temperature in JULY is 37 degrees F.



5. Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, Canada

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Snag, Yukon is the coldest place in North America, with a record low of -81 degrees F in 1947, but the city was officially closed in 2006, so nobody lives there anymore. That makes Yellowknife the current Canadian champ — the 20,000 people here freeze through -26 degrees F temperatures in January, with a coldest ever recorded at -60 degrees F.



6. Norilsk, Russia

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Norilsk is one of the coldest big cities in the world. Around 200,000 people live in this industrial town, and anybody who isn’t Russian or Belorusian is not allowed to enter (and that's the truth). But could anyone who wasn’t Russian even handle going to Norilsk? It’s covered in snow about 250 days out of the year, with snow storms going for a third of the year, and it doesn’t see the sun for six weeks in winter. Average January temperatures are -16.4 degrees F. and there are only a few trees in the entire city.



7. Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

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Ulaanbaatar is the coldest capital city in the world, with winter temperatures between -32 and -40 degrees F. 1.3 million people freeze their butts off here for most of the year.

So, where do you think the residents of Norilsk and Oymyakon will settle when they come occupy the U.S.? Will they stay in chillier areas like Wisconsin, so as to not shock their systems too much? Or head straight for Florida? Tweet at me and let me know @erikaheidewald!