10 Commonly Misspelled Places in America

Of course you would never misspell any of these (or misspell “misspell’ as “mispell”). Of course you would never write “Arkansas” with a “w” because of how it sounds. But the following are indeed some of the most commonly misspelled locations in the United States according to both Google and highly exasperated teachers everywhere…

 

Juneau, AK

poster for Juneau, Alaska chicken summit

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Perhaps it’s due in small part to an Ellen Page movie from 2007. Or maybe because people aren’t used to stringing that many vowels in a row without it being the chorus to “Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” But whatever the reason “Juno” has become the most common spelling of a state capital that can’t seem to write its correct name big enough on its welcome signs.

 

Pittsburgh, PA

airport luggage carts with Welcome to Pittsburgh signs

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In 1890 the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (yes, there is such an office in case you are really late in scoring a summer internship that could easily ruin your August) decided that all cities ending in “burgh” should drop the final “h.” But either because they held on screaming to their last letter or never got the telegraph, Pittsburgh didn’t make the alteration, thereby resulting in what Google’s search engine has decreed called the most misspelled city in the country.

 

Asheville, NC

Love Asheville sign promoting people to buy local

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Nashville doesn’t have some extraneous “e” before “ville” confusing everyone in a rush to mail out a letter, so why does Asheville? Well, maybe it’s like in England where they seem to just randomly add an extra “u” to words like “colour” or “favourite” or “youu.” Or maybe this is what happens when too many hippies gather in one city together.

 

Tucson, AZ

1950’s era sign for Tucson Inn in Arizona

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What does it take to be the second-most misspelled American city according to Google’s search engine? Apparently a “c” that comes out of freaking nowhere, resulting not only in countless red marks on geography quizzes but also people driving aimlessly around Arizona looking for “Tuxson.”

 

Gloucester, MA

sign for Gorton Fisherman company on Gloucester, MA

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In Massachusetts it’s pronounced “Glawster” (but really “Glowstah”), leading people to wonder what the hell’s the deal with the “ce” in the middle. It also doesn’t help that a many people also have trouble spelling “Massachusetts,” resulting in countless letters that never quite get to their destination thanks to pissed off New England postal clerks.

 

Tallahassee, FL

street sign for haunted house in Tallahassee, Florida

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There are two l’s. There are also two s’s. There are even two e’s. Hell, the place has got three a’s, though not in a row, just to blow the spelling rhythm altogether. Why there aren’t six t’s and maybe a backwards Russian “R” may have to do with the fact the original naming committee couldn’t stop laughing hard enough to cram in all their drunk ideas.

 

Niagara Falls, NY

close-up of city emblem for Niagara Falls, New York

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No matter how many t-shirts, mugs, bumper stickers, magnets, snow globes, and other tourist trap crap Niagara falls puts their name on things, far too many people keep spelling it as “Niagra,” meaning that the city will keep making useless keepsake junk until everybody gets it right.

 

Albuquerque, NM

sign featuring phrase ‘Shoulda made that left turn at Albuquerque’ with drawing of Bugs Bunny

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Albuquerque is actually spelled pretty close to how it’s pronounced—“AL-buh-kur-kee”—if how you spell hard “k” sounds is with several q’s, u’s, and an extra “e” for no other point than to result in the city constantly having to send back its signs to the printer with a note reading “Try again.”

 

Cincinnati, OH

logo for 1970’s sitcom for ‘WKRP in Cincinnati’

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Thanks to a certain, sadly forgotten TV show about a radio station from the late 70’s, there is a chance your parents have a pretty good shot at spelling this city correctly. The rest of us, though, just keep trying and trying until we simply write “Ohio.”

 

Coxsackie, NY

highway sign for Coxsackie, NY

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It’s not that people can’t figure out how to spell this small town in upstate New York. It’s that no one want to spell it correctly because, let’s face it, what’s the fun in that?

 

Which one was your favorite? Let me know in the comments!

Check out 21 Hilariously Misspelled Signs!